Last edited by Taramar
Sunday, August 9, 2020 | History

1 edition of snow accumulation and melt in sprayed and undisturbed big sagebrush vegetation found in the catalog.

snow accumulation and melt in sprayed and undisturbed big sagebrush vegetation

by D.L. Sturges

  • 82 Want to read
  • 29 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Artemisia tridentata

  • Edition Notes

    Other titles[Influence of big sagebrush control on] snow accumulation and melt in sprayed and undisturbed big sagebrush [Artemisia tridentata] vegetation
    ContributionsU.S. Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station
    The Physical Object
    Pagination6 p.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25655181M

    Subalpine, or spicate big sagebrush, is believed to be a stabilized hybrid between mountain big sagebrush and silver sagebrush (Artemisia cana Pursh ssp. viscidula [Osterhout] Beetle). Plants are similar to those of mountain big sagebrush except that leaves and floral heads are larger, the floral heads having 10 to 18 flowers per head. The energy gained at the snow surface (Fig. 2e and f) raised the surface snow temperature to the melting point and caused snow to melt. During the snow melting periods (e.g. DOY in Fig. 3a and DOY in Fig. 3b), latent heat Q le increased due to the presence ofCited by:

      Snow and certain vegetation spatial patterns reinforce each other. Near the treeline, where forest gives way to tundra, trees may grow in ribbon forests. As the name suggests, these are narrow bands of trees, and in the open spaces between trees, snow often forms drifts. The forest ribbons operate like snow fences. the fuel, nutrient, and vegetation changes to prescribed fire conducted in two seasons (spring and fall) and in three different states of ecological condition and recent fire history. All experimental units were located in the same common habitat type and soil series (i.e., mountain big sagebrush/bluebunch wheatgrass-Thurber’s needlegrass).

    Because melt occurred between 5 and 25 May, we only used snow depths from the 5 May flight as these values better represented snow depths near peak accumulation. The average RMSE (n = 21) of lidar‐derived snow depths for BCW was 16 cm. Average winter temperature and total precipitation were −°C and 85 cm, respectively, and the average Cited by: vegetation and soil conditions that influence hydrologic processes including infiltration, surface runoff, erosion, sediment transport, and flooding. Post wildfire hydrologic response was studied in big sagebrush plant communities on steep slopes with coarse-textured soils. Significant rill erosion was observed following both thunderstorm and rapid.


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Snow accumulation and melt in sprayed and undisturbed big sagebrush vegetation by D.L. Sturges Download PDF EPUB FB2

Snow accumulation and melt in sprayed and undisturbed big sagebrush vegetation. Fort Collins, Colo.: Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, (OCoLC) Snow accumulation and melt in sprayed and undisturbed big sagebrush vegetation / (Fort Collins, Colo.: Dept.

of Agriculture, Forest service, Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, ), by David L. Sturges, United States Forest Service, and Colo.) Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Fort Collins (page images at.

Mountain big sagebrush steppes in Wyoming have strong spatial patterning associated with topography. We describe the spatial variability of vegetation in a sagebrush steppe, and test the relationship between topography and vegetation using canonical correlation. Results of the analysis suggest that the main control over vegetation distribution in this system is wind by: Soil water dynamics drive potential big sagebrush migration: Our ecohydrological niche-modeling work linked process-based soil water assessment tools with species distribution models to identify where big sagebrush distribution may shift upslope and northward in coming decades.

(See Schlaepfer et al Ecography.) Interactions between climate and vegetation can have unexpected impacts on. sion of other sagebrush species- then abruptly change on a sharp line to big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt.).

This paper describes the vege- tation and soils occurring on this range site, and compares both to the vegetation and soils on adja- cent range sites having a cover of big by: Sagebrush Identification, Ecology, and Palatability Relative to Sage-Grouse Roger Rosentreter Abstract—Basic identification keys and comparison tables for 23 low and big sagebrush (Artemisia) taxa are presented.

Differences in sagebrush ecology, soil temperature regimes, geographic range, palatability, mineralogy, and chemistry are discussed Cited by: in the snow-free and peak-snow-accumulation peri-ods were analyzed for topographic and vegetation effects on snow accumulation.

Point-cloud data were processed from four primarily mixed-conifer forest sites covering the main snow-accumulation zone, with a total surveyed area of over km2.

The percentage of pixels with at least one snow-Cited by: Healthy sagebrush ecosystems consist of a diverse plant and animal community. Approximately 90 bird species and more than 85 mammals use sagebrush lands for cover and food sources.

Birds that require sagebrush for survival include the Greater sage-grouse, sage sparrow, sage thrasher, Brewer's sparrow, and green-tailed towhee.

Undisturbed samples 3 in. in diameter were obtained at different overburden pressures. These samples were sealed with end packers and stored overnight in a vertical position. The following day each tube was placed in a horizontal position in a wooden carrying rack, and the top of each tube was marked for orientation purposes.

i Author Information (all are current or former USDA Forest Service employees) Deborah M. Finch is a Supervisory Biologist and Program Manager with the Rocky Mountain Research Station (RMRS) in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Douglas A. Boyce, Jr., is a National Wildlife Ecologist with the National Forest System in Washington, DC. Jeanne C. Chambers is a Research Ecologist with RMRS in Reno, by: 3. Thousands of hectares of high quality shrub steppe burned in large fires in and in the Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve on the Hanford Reach National Monument.

Extensive permanent vegetation monitoring plots were established throughout this area in the mids, and many of these plots were remonitored following the fire. In addition, rehabilitation efforts to control invasive.

Results. Application of a customized snow fence design (the Hollow Frame Fence System, HFFS) significantly increased vegetation establishment of the framework taxon, Artemisia tridentata Nutt. spp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young, and other native sagebrush-steppe species.

The HFFS exhibited significantly fewer invasive species than control blocks; establishment of A. tridentata was significantly Cited by: 1. Simulating snowmelt processes during rain-on-snow over a semi-arid mountain basin 22% aspen and 66% mixed sagebrush (primarily mountain big sagebrush)).

of simulated snow accumulation and. Perennial grass and total herbaceous biomass varied by the interaction between treatment and year (P ).Perennial grass biomass did not differ between treatments in (Fig.

3A; P = ), whereas in and it was fold and fold greater in Cited by: Snow course sampling was carried out during the spring ofa year with 25% below average snow accumulation, and in spring ofa year with 25% above average snow accumulation for the region.

Original Article Burning and Mowing Wyoming Big Sagebrush: Do Treated Sites Meet Minimum Guidelines for Greater Sage-Grouse Breeding Habitats. JENNIFER E.

HESS,1,2 Department of Ecosystem Science and Management, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Wyoming, DepartmentE University Avenue, Laramie, WYUSA.

from these studies about the entire vegetation type. The purpose of this paper is to review the early written descriptions of the sagebrush-grass vegetation areas in an attempt to assess the relative i,mp&-tance of herbaceous plants and woody brush in rn Intermountain West.

Such an. big sagebrush, therefore, providing data on brows ing im pacts. Effects of Wildlife Utilization and Grass Seeding Rates on Bg Sagebrush Partlow, Olson, Schuman, and Belden USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P Browsing on vegetation can be positive, such as compensa-tory growth due to moderate use (McNaughton ), or.

They eat it, they nest in it, hide in it, seek cover during the winter under big sagebrush’s branches. Lose the sagebrush, and you lose the sage grouse. It’s that simple. For years, sagebrush was considered a nuisance plant, and range managers burned it, sprayed it and knocked it over by dragging chains across the desert.

Reseeding efforts in Wyoming big sagebrush- (Artemisia tridentata Nutt ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young) dominated rangelands often involve complete removal of all vegetation prior to reseeding (McArthur, Monsen, and Welch, ). In contrast, minimal mechanical disturbance associated with.

The years to, to and exhibited high snow accumulation similar to the snow survey year and the model achieved high coefficients of determinants (r 2 =P accumulation with no significant correlation with the snow survey by: individual big sagebrush plants were entirely dead in the unsprayed and sprayed strip, respectively.

Only 4 percent of sage grouse observations were made on the sprayed strips of the 1,acre study area. Canopy coverage of herbaceous vegetation at sage grouse locations consisted of ap-proximately 60 percent grasses and 40 percent forbs.Steep Mountain Big Sagebrush Communities Frederick B.

Pierson, Peter R. Robichaud, Kenneth E. Spaeth, Corey A. Moffet Abstract Wildfire is an important ecological process and management issue on western rangelands. Major unknowns associated with wildfire are its affects on vegetation and soil conditions that influence hydrologic.